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dc.contributor.author Ostro, Steven J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2004-10-05T21:35:55Z
dc.date.available 2004-10-05T21:35:55Z
dc.date.issued 1994-03 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Holland en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 94-0506 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/33777
dc.description.abstract The nature of a radar experiment varies dramatically from target to target. For example, one usually transmits continuously for a duration equal to the two-way light travel time to the target (that is, until the first echoes are about to return) and then receives for a similar length of time. A complete transmit/receive cycle would take more than four hours for observations of Titan, but as little as 12 minutes for Mars less than one minute for an asteroid ten lunar distances from Earth. en_US
dc.format.extent 521546 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject.other Radar experiment Solar System Radar Observation Megallan Comets en_US
dc.title Radar Astronomy en_US


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