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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/41633

Title: Targeting low-energy ballistic lunar transfers
Authors: Parker, Jeffrey S.
Keywords: Low-energy transfers
Earth
Moon
Issue Date: 13-May-2010
Publisher: Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2010.
Citation: American Astronautical Society (AAS) George H. Born Symposium, Boulder, Colorado. May 13, 2010.
Abstract: Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the ΔV cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5◦, on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the ΔV cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/41633
Appears in Collections:JPL TRS 1992+

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