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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/41334

Title: Quasat astrophysics with the space interferometry mission
Authors: Unwin, Stephen
Wehrle, Ann
Meier, David
Jones, Dayton
Piner, Glenn
Keywords: Astrometry
instrumentation
quasars
radiation mechanisms
Issue Date: 15-Oct-2007
Publisher: Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2007.
Citation: IAU Symposium 248, Shanghai, China, October 15, 2007
Abstract: Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/41334
Appears in Collections:JPL TRS 1992+

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