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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/40376

Title: Processing of Mars Exploration Rover imagery for science and operations planning
Authors: Alexander, Douglass A.
Deen, Robert G.
Andres, Paul M.
Zamani, Payam
Mortensen, Helen B.
Chen, Amy C.
Cayanan, Michael K.
Hall, Jeffrey R.
Klochko, Vadim S.
Pariser, Oleg
Stanley, Carol L.
Thompson, Charles K.
Yagi, Gary M.
Keywords: Mars
planetary sciences
Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL)
Instruments
techniques
Issue Date: 4-Feb-2006
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Citation: Journal Of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, E02S02, doi:10.1029/2005je002462, 2006
Abstract: The twin Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) delivered an unprecedented array of image sensors to the Mars surface. These cameras were essential for operations, science, and public engagement. The Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was responsible for the first-order processing of all of the images returned by these cameras. This processing included reconstruction of the original images, systematic and ad hoc generation of a wide variety of products derived from those images, and delivery of the data to a variety of customers, within tight time constraints. A combination of automated and manual processes was developed to meet these requirements, with significant inheritance from prior missions. This paper describes the image products generated by MIPL for MER and the processes used to produce and deliver them.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/40376
Appears in Collections:JPL TRS 1992+

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