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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/39247

Title: An integrated view of the chemistry and mineralogy of Martian soils.
Authors: Yen, Albert S.
Gellert, Ralf
Schroder, Christian
Morris, Richard V.
Bell, James F. III
Knudson, Amy T.
Clark, Benton C.
Ming, Douglas W.
Crisp, Joy A.
Arvidson, Raymond E.
Blaney, Diana
Bruckner, Johannes
Christensen, Philip R.
DesMarais, David J.
de Souza, Paulo A. Jr
Economou, Thanasis E.
Ghosh, Amitabha
Hahn, Brian C.
Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.
Haskin, Larry A.
Hurowitz, Joel A.
Joliff, Bradley L.
Johnson, Jeffrey R.
Klingelhofer, Gostar
Madsen, Morten Bo
McLennan, Scott M.
McSween, Harry Y.
Richter, Lutz
Rieder, Rudi
Rodionov, Daniel
Soderblom, Larry
Squyres, Steven W.
Tosca, Nicholas J.
Wang, Alian
Wyatt, Michael
Zipfel, Jutta
Keywords: Mars Exploration Rover (MER)
Gusev crater
martian soils
bright dust
Issue Date: 7-Jul-2005
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Nature, Vol. 436, pg 49-54
Abstract: The mineralogical and elemental compositions of the martian soil are indicators of chemical and physical weathering processes. Using data from the Mars Exploration Rovers, we show that bright dust deposits on opposite sides of the planet are part of a global unit and not dominated by the composition of local rocks. Dark soil deposits at both sites have similar basaltic mineralogies, and could reflect either a global component or the general similarity in the compositions of the rocks from which they were derived. Increased levels of bromine are consistent with mobilization of soluble salts by thin films of liquid water, but the presence of olivine in analysed soil samples indicates that the extent of aqueous alteration of soils has been limited. Nickel abundances are enhanced at the immediate surface and indicate that the upper few millimetres of soil could contain up to one per cent meteoritic material.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/39247
Appears in Collections:JPL TRS 1992+

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