NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Follow this link to skip to the main content

BEACON eSpace at Jet Propulsion Laboratory >
JPL Technical Report Server >
JPL TRS 1992+ >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/38713

Title: Cassini-Huygens maneuver automation for navigation
Authors: Goodson, Troy
Attiyah, Amy
Buffington, Brent
Hahn, Yungsun
Pojman, Joan
Stavert, Bob
Strange, Nathan
Stumpf, Paul
Wagner, Sean
Wolff, Peter
Wong, Mau
Keywords: propulsion maneuvers
Maneuver Automation Software (MAS)
Issue Date: 22-Jan-2006
Publisher: Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2006.
Citation: 2006 AAS/AIAA SpaceFlight Mechanics Meeting, Tampa, Florida, January 22-26, 2006.
Abstract: Many times during the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, propulsive maneuvers must be spaced so closely together that there isn’t enough time or workforce to execute the maneuver-related software manually, one subsystem at a time. Automation is required. Automating the maneuver design process has involved close cooperation between teams. We present the contribution from the Navigation system. In scope, this includes trajectory propagation and search, generation of ephemerides, general tasks such as email notification and file transfer, and presentation materials. The software has been used to help understand maneuver optimization results, Huygens probe delivery statistics, and Saturn ring-plane crossing geometry. The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS), developed for the Cassini-Huygens program enables frequent maneuvers by handling mundane tasks such as creation of deliverable files, file delivery, generation and transmission of email announcements, generation of presentation material and other supporting documentation. By hand, these tasks took up hours, if not days, of work for each maneuver. Automated, these tasks may be completed in under an hour. During the cruise trajectory the spacing of maneuvers was such that development of a maneuver design could span about a month, involving several other processes in addition to that described, above. Often, about the last five days of this process covered the generation of a final design using an updated orbit-determination estimate. To support the tour trajectory, the orbit determination data cut-off of five days before the maneuver needed to be reduced to approximately one day and the whole maneuver development process needed to be reduced to less than a week..
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/38713
Appears in Collections:JPL TRS 1992+

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
06-0225.pdf481.65 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, but are furnished with U.S. government purpose use rights.

 

Privacy/Copyright Image Policy Beacon Home Contact Us
NASA Home Page + Div 27
+ JPL Space
Site last updated on December 5, 2014.
If you have any comments or suggestions for this web site, please e-mail Robert Powers.